KEEN!

Chuck Wendig of Terrible Minds has issued a challenge.  He wants to collaboratively build a world.

The rules are pretty simple (go to his site and see!)  As a GM and a writer, I am very intrigued by this idea. I have decided to participate. The entries are in the comments and BOY! are there some really good ideas.
I’m so excited! I can’t wait to see what all comes out of this. 🙂

Here’s what I wrote:

Blackbloom. Hmm.

The planet is home to two sentient races. One is a human-like people. They call themselves the Watu. They are an intellectually and technologically advanced people.
The other race are darkly opalescent energy creatures. These number far less than the Watu. They call themselves Roho. Not much is known about them, except their claim that they have always been there.

The sun is blue dwarf star that has swirling, black energies coruscating across its surface. Every three thousand years these energies flare, enveloping the planet and killing almost the entire Watu population. Those who are left are plunged back into a savage hunter-gatherer status. And the Roho guide them back (again) to their previous intellectually and technologically advanced society.

The Watu have no idea about the star’s destructive tendencies. But the Roho do.
They always have.


What is love?

What does love look like?

According to that video, love is badly dressed people running amok in a castle while an emotionless man lip-syncs his own song. Which I gotta believe, ain’t the truth of anything, much less amour.  So. What is love?

Now, that’s a serious question meant from a writer’s perspective. What does love, being in love, loving your mate…what do those look like to you?

I’m pretty sure that it doesn’t look like what you see on television. Here’s proof: those people kiss (passionately, even) first thing in the morning.
BLECH.
I don’t know what happens in your house?  But in mine there is teeth-brushing before there is tongue wrangling. Morning breath. Ew, ew, ew.

ANYWAY.

I know that for me, love is this constant, low hum of content. It is coming downstairs to find Mister Man stretched out on the couch and laying down on top of him to snuggle. (If I can get an “OOOF!” out of him, so much the better.) It is giggling together in the morning. It is nomming on his eyebrow – zombie camel kisses. Cheering when either spies the other naked. Talking about life – school, work, the Girl, bills. Bringing him a cup of coffee while he showers. It is always trying to resolve arguments before we go to bed.

Are all those things “normal” expressions of caring? Are they things that I should include in my stories? I have an extremely difficult time writing love scenes. I would much rather write about tentacles and murder and potentially undead bosses and drug use.

*reads that last sentence again*

…Maybe I can’t write a love scene because I am disturbed in some way.

Never, *EVER* Google the phrase "Tentacle Love" unless you are prepared for the consequences.

 

 

 

 

 

 

I figure that there must be some sort of learning curve on writing a believable (note I didn’t say “realistic”) love story. Where and how do you pick that particular skill up? Are there lessons taught by descendants of Rudolf Valentino? Does Cary Elwes show up in a black mask and a semi-attached mustache to be your Love Muse? Why the hell not?

I'll be your huckleber...excuse me, Muse.

 

 

 

 

Frumpy? You’re soaking in it!

Here’s a question: who determines the rules for fashion & hair style? They seem so irrational. As if they are designed to squelch unique fashion, while at the same time promoting a look that is designed for only young, hot people. Older folks* are pretty much expected to curl up in a corner and pretend that they don’t exist, except to buy clothing for young people.

I ask because I am in somewhat of a quandry. I am a 41 year old Mom with a kid in middle school. Therefore, I am expected by the fashion industry to look somewhat like this:

"I'll take a half-caff, half-fat soy latte grande with rose-scented syrup and whipped cream made from the milk of sacred cows."

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

But, I am also a tattooed gamer with a love of goth and stompy boots. RPGs, snark, Sci-Fi (not to be confused with Syfy, which is apparently a disease of the intellect) and music with a BPM higher than 140 make me super happy.
According to much and more on the internet, all of this also makes me a “dork.”


Wait. What do you mean that's a boy? PFFT. I know a goth-mommy when I see one

 

 

 

Heh.
There is always room for Marilyn-mocking.

 

 

 

 

The actual problem:

I am re-entering the professional workforce; or rather, attempting to re-enter the workforce. That means interviews. Which means that my lengthy, still somewhat streakily blue and yet gray at the roots hair should probably be styled. Or at the very least, snipped. Furthermore, I am getting touch tired of waking up with my hair wrapped around me like semi-sentient mummy bandages.

Bring Mommy the brush!

 

 

 

 

 

 

JIBBLIES.

What to do, what to do. I would like to get my hair styled. However,I know that walking into any standard stylist will be a frumpy mistake. And walking into a non-standard one will be a costly one.

“Oh, so you want to re-capture your youth while not looking like you are trying to do so? Bettie Page bangs for you!”
“You did notice that my face and body type are neither Betty nor Page, right?”
“Don’t worry! You’ll love it. That’ll be a beeeeelyun dollars, plus tip.”

Pictured: Not my face.

How do I convey to potential employers my value, my skill and my abilities without scaring them off because I don’t look like what they expect?

Let’s not even – right now – get into the whole ageism in the workforce. That is a post for a whole ‘nother day.

Feh, I say. Feh and fist shaking.

I am off to get a hair cut. When I return and if I like the results, I’ll post a picture of the outcome.
In the meantime, wish this “old” gamer good luck.

* – No. Forty is NOT old. I don’t buy into the whole “old” thing except as a measure of how you feel.

**ETA**
Seriously, WordPress?  The formatting of the images and text looked great until I published it.